Stony Brook University Office of Research Services
Month: February, 2012

16th Annual Swartz Foundation Mind Brain Lecture

Monday, April 16 – 4:30 pm

Staller Center Main Stage

The Provost’s Office has announced a lecture by John P. Donoghue, Ph.D., as part of the 16th Annual Swartz Foundation Mind Brain Lecture. Professor Donoghue is the Henry Merritt Wriston Professor of Neuroscience and Engineering, and Director of the Institute for Brain Science, at Brown University. He is also a Senior Research Scientist with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

In this lecture, Donoghue will discuss his research on how the cerebral cortex  computes commands for voluntary movements. His laboratory is translating advances from this fundamental research into a human neural interface system, called BrainGate, which is designed to restore useful functions for people with paralysis. BrainGate physically reconnects the brain to the outside world through a baby aspirin-sized sensor that is implanted into the motor cortex. In the BrainGate pilot clinical trial, persons with long-standing paralysis have used their own neural signals to operate external assistive devices, including computers and robotic limbs.  

The Mind Brain Lecture will be presented on Monday, April 16, 2012 at 4:30 p.m. on the Staller Center Main Stage. Please save the date, and pass along this information to any students or community members you feel may be interested in this special event. Seating is limited and on a first-come basis. For more information on this lecture, please visit http://www.stonybrook.edu/sb/mind/index.shtml

ACADEMY eBRIEFINGS

From the New York Academy of Sciences  

 

Leadership and Personal Success Through Self-Awareness and Emotional Intelligence

http://www.nyas.org/Publications/EBriefings/Detail.aspx?cid=72ab4c7d-0f34-4357-88cb-808888769e43

The eBriefing is a workshop for increasing self-awareness, emotional intelligence, and leadership skills from the perspective of scientific fields such as cognitive behavioral science, evolutionary psychology, and positive psychology.

 

From Scientist to Entrepreneur

http://www.nyas.org/Publications/EBriefings/Detail.aspx?cid=f2b0dc45-d932-4b31-ba93-9aee5394b134

Seminars in this series provide an in-depth look at everything from opportunity recognition, to leading tech transfer and writing a comprehensive business plan—critical information for scientists considering commercializing their innovations.

Editor’s Guide to Writing and Publishing Your Paper

http://www.nyas.org/Publications/EBriefings/Detail.aspx?cid=fe028ae7-430c-4068-a305-f930aaf05e8f

Publishing is critical to the scientific profession yet few opportunities exist for science PhDs to gain formal training in this area. A former editor for the Journal of Clinical Investigation provided an inside look into the editorial review process and how to present scientific results.

Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program

Funding Opportunities for Fiscal Year 2012

The Fiscal Year 2012 (FY12) Defense Appropriations Act provides $120 million (M) to the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) to support innovative, high-impact breast cancer research.  The BCRP is administered by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC) through the Office of Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP).

The Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) has released the following Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) funding mechanisms for Fiscal Year 2012.

Clinical Translational Research Award
Eligibility: Investigators at or above the level of Assistant Professor (or equivalent).

Key Mechanism Elements:
*Supports the acceleration of research with a high potential for direct clinical translation that will result in significant improvements over current approaches to breast cancer prevention and/or therapy.
*Applications will be supported in two stages.  Stage I will enable completion of preclinical translational studies and Food and Drug Administration approvals (if needed).  Stage II will initiate and execute the prospective clinical trial
*Preliminary data are required.
*Preproposal is required; application submission is by invitation only.

Pre-Application: May 3, 2012
Application: August 15, 2012

Maximum funding of $12M for direct costs (plus indirect costs).
Period of performance not to exceed 5 years.

Era of Hope Scholar Award
Eligibility: Independent, non-mentored investigators within 6 years of their last mentored position as of the application submission deadline.

Key Mechanism Elements:
*Supports exceptionally talented, creative early-career scientists who have demonstrated that they are the “best and brightest” in their fields.
*Individuals should exhibit strong potential for leadership in the breast cancer community.

Pre-Application (Letter of Intent): April 5, 2012
Confidential Letters of Recommendation: April 19, 2012
Application: April 19, 2012

Maximum funding of $2.5M for direct costs (plus indirect costs).
Period of performance not to exceed 5 years.

Idea Award
Eligibility: Investigators at all academic levels (or equivalent).

Key Mechanism Elements:
*Supports innovative, high-risk/high-reward research ideas that have extraordinary potential to yield highly impactful data.
*Innovation and Impact are the most important review criteria.
*Preliminary data are allowed, but not required.
*Partnering Principal Investigator (PI) Option supports combining expertise of two PIs to more effectively address a research question.
*Preproposal is required; limit of one preproposal per PI; application submission is by invitation only.

Pre-Application: April 26, 2012
Application: August 15, 2012

Maximum funding of $375K for direct costs (plus indirect costs).
Period of performance not to exceed 2 years.

Impact Award
Eligibility: Investigators at or above the level of Assistant Professor (or equivalent).

Key Mechanism Elements:
*Supports unique research projects that focus on scientific and clinical breast cancer issues, which, if successfully addressed, could ultimately have a major impact on the understanding, prevention, and/or treatment of breast cancer.

*Preproposal is required; application submission is by invitation only.

Pre-Application: May 3, 2012
Application: August 15, 2012

Maximum funding of $2M for direct costs (plus indirect costs).
Period of performance not to exceed 5 years.

Innovator Award
Eligibility: Associate Professor or above (or equivalent).

Key Mechanism Elements:
*Supports visionary individuals who have demonstrated creativity, innovative work, and leadership in any field.
*Provides opportunity to pursue novel, visionary, high-risk ideas that could ultimately lead to the end of breast cancer.
*Nomination is required and self-nominations are accepted; application submission is by invitation only.

Pre-Application (Letter of Intent): May 3, 2012
Confidential Letters of Recommendation: August 2, 2012
Application: August 2, 2012

Maximum funding of $5M for direct costs (plus indirect costs).
Period of performance not to exceed 5 years.

Postdoctoral Fellowship Award
Eligibility: Principal Investigator:  Doctoral graduates (Ph.D. or M.D.).  Clinical investigators are eligible to apply.  Must have no more than 2 years experience in the proposed research setting and no more than 4 years of postdoctoral research experience as of the application deadline.
Mentor or formal co-mentor must have breast cancer research experience, including current funding and publications.

Key Mechanism Elements:
*Supports the training of exceptionally talented recent doctoral graduates.
*Individualized training program and mentorship should prepare the PI for an independent career at the forefront of breast cancer research.
*Proposed research should address a critical problem in breast cancer research.

Pre-Application (Letter of Intent): April 5, 2012
Confidential Letters of Recommendation: April 19, 2012
Application: April 19, 2012

Maximum funding of $300K for direct costs ($100K per year; plus indirect costs).
Period of performance not to exceed 3 years.

Transformative Vision Award
Eligibility: Independent investigators at any academic level (or equivalent).

Key Mechanism Elements:
*Supports a research effort to realize a vision for dramatically affecting the prevention or treatment of breast cancer as quickly as possible.
*Teams must include consumer advocates who will be integrated into the planning and implementation of the research project.
*Applications with multiple PIs are allowed; however, PIs should have demonstrated experience in successfully leading large, focused projects.
*Preproposal is required; application submission is by invitation only.

Pre-Application: May 3, 2012
Application: August 15, 2012

Period of performance not to exceed 5 years.
Maximum funding of $12M for direct costs (plus indirect costs).

All applications must conform to the final program announcements and application instructions available for electronic downloading from the Grants.gov website.  The application package containing the required forms for each award mechanism will also be found on Grants.gov.  A listing of all USAMRMC funding opportunities can be obtained on the Grants.gov website by performing a basic search using CFDA Number 12.420. 

Please review the program announcement for further details:

http://cdmrp.army.mil/funding/bcrp.shtml

A pre-application is required and must be submitted through the CDMRP eReceipt website (http://cdmrp.org) prior to the pre-application deadline.  Applications must be submitted through the federal government’s single-entry portal, Grants.gov.  Requests for email notification of the program announcements release may be sent to help@cdmrp.org.  For more information about the BCRP or other CDMRP-administered programs, please visit the CDMRP website (http://cdmrp.army.mil).

Laboratory Safety and Compliance Responsibilities

A letter to the Campus Community

We are writing to bring to your attention some recent developments related to a number of laboratory accidents and to emphasize the need for your awareness and personal involvement to assure the safety of all laboratory personnel and facilities.

As you may know, felony charges have been filed against UCLA and an esteemed chemistry professor in connection with a fatal laboratory fire that occurred over three years ago.  The charges specifically cite a willful failure to: develop and use standard operating procedures; correct unsafe workplace conditions in a timely manner; require appropriate clothing and personal protective equipment; and provide lab specific safety training to employees.  Since that time, there have been other accidents that have received national attention, including a machine shop accident, chemistry lab explosions and lab acquired infections.

These incidents will no doubt have a profound effect on how granting agencies award funding, how regulators inspect laboratories, and how the public perceives our institutions and research.  More importantly, they underscore the responsibilities that we all have to ensure compliance with required laboratory safety policies, procedures and regulations.

The Department of Environmental Health & Safety, under the leadership of Executive Director Gary Kaczmarczyk, has developed a comprehensive laboratory safety program, including policies, procedures, training and inspections.  EH&S Laboratory Safety Specialists can provide additional guidance to assist you with hazard reviews, protocols and training, but you must ensure that procedures are followed, lab safety equipment is operational and used, and that proper lab attire (no shorts or sandals), lab coats, safety glasses, etc., are worn.

With your awareness and involvement we will continue to build a strong safety culture and help assure the success of the academic and research mission of the University. Please visit the EH&S website at http://www.stonybrook.edu/ehs/ where you can find information about laboratory safety requirements and your responsibilities.

Sincerely,

Samuel L. Stanley Jr., M.D.
President, Stony Brook University

Dennis N. Assanis, Ph.D.
Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

Kenneth Kaushansky, M.D., M.A.C.P.
Senior Vice President, Health Sciences Dean, School of Medicine

Barbara Chernow
Senior Vice President for Administration

2012 National Medals – Call for Nominations

National Medal of Science

The National Medal of Science, established in 1959, is the Nation’s highest honor for American scientists and engineers. It is awarded to individuals who deserve special recognition for their outstanding cumulative contributions to knowledge in the chemical, physical, biological, mathematical, engineering, or behavioral or social sciences, in combination with their exemplary service to the Nation. The Medal is administered by the National Science Foundation and, to date, has been awarded to over 450 individuals.

Nominations include the nomination itself and three letters of reference, and must be submitted by March 31, 2012.

Please review the NEW nomination information and submit your nominations through FastLane. We are especially interested in identifying women, members of minority groups, and persons with disabilities for consideration.

A PDF version of the call for nominations is available here: nsf_2012nationalmedalofscience_callfornominations_120127.pdf

 

National Medal of Technology and Innovation

The National Medal of Technology and Innovation, first awarded in 1985, is the Nation’s highest honor for technological achievement and innovation. It is awarded to individuals, teams, companies, or divisions for their outstanding contributions to the Nation’s economic, environmental, and social well-being through the development and commercialization of technology products, processes, and concepts; technological innovation; and development of the Nation’s technological manpower.

Nominations include the nomination itself and six letters of support and must be submitted by March 31, 2012. Please see http://www.uspto.gov/about/nmti/index.jsp for nomination materials and procedures.

Grant Writing for Research

A Presentation by the SUNY Center for Professional Development, in partnership with The Research Foundation

Dates:   Begins March 7th and Ends March 26th   (Online format) 

Based on the book, Writing Successful Science Proposals* this virtual workshop outlines the components of a successful proposal and the steps to get there. Learn how to improve your chances of getting funded through fund sourcing, proper planning and organization, concise writing, collaboration, and proposal submission. Participate in interactive and relevant discussions and activities with faculty from the comfort of your home or office.

* Although the course is based on a book about scientific proposals the learning and activities are applicable to all types of grant proposals

At completion of this workshop, all students should be able to: 

• Define the types of grants available
• Find grant opportunities
• Find and work with collaborators
• Develop concise proposal sections
• Submit a proposal electronically

Required Text: Participants should purchase Writing Successful Science Proposals, 2nd edition by Andrew J. Friedland and Carol L. Folt available at Amazon.com or Barnes & Noble.com

Format:

Meets Online Via Elluminate on:  March 7,  12, 14, 19, 21, and 26 from 3:00 – 4:30 pm;   Participants are expected to participate in each of the 1.5 hr sessions. 

What is the cost?

$200  –    CPD Members – Use your CPD Training Points to pay for this event!

$230 –  SUNY Non-CPD Members

$260 – Non-SUNY

The Research Foundation has established an RF/SUNY Scholarship Program which awards CPD points to SUNY faculty, post-docs, grad students and sponsored program administrators to participate in CPD-sponsored opportunities. Contact Patricia Aceves, in the Department of Teaching, Learning, &Technology (patricia.aceves@stonybrook.edu) ext. 2-2786 for further information on accessing CPD points to attend these programs.

SUNY Center for Professional Development – Faculty Development Workshops

The SUNY Center for Professional Development (CPD) and Pacific Crest are pleased to bring you this series of Faculty Development Workshops. These one-day workshops will provide participants with an introduction to the concepts and goals of each area within the context of Process EducationTM. Process EducationTM is a performance-based philosophy of education which integrates many different educational theories, processes, and tools in emphasizing the continuous development of learning skills.

 

Monday, February 27thOrientation to Process Education

Location: Medaille College, Buffalo

Time: 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

An introduction to innovative tools and processes that increase student success. For complete details, costs, and to register, visit: http://www.cvent.com/d/zcq9vk

 

Tuesday, February 28thCritical Thinking

Location: The College at Brockport, Brockport

Time: 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

Creating learning activities that target the improvement of students’ critical thinking skills, and disciplinary contexts. For complete details, costs, and to register, visit: http://www.cvent.com/d/5cq9dv

 

Wednesday, February 29thStudent Success

Location: Onondaga Community College, Syracuse

Time: 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

Learn strategies and tools to develop personal growth and increased success in students. For complete details, costs, and to register, visit: http://www.cvent.com/d/rcq9mw

 

Friday, March 2ndScholarship of Teaching & Learning

Location: Suffolk County Community College, Ammerman Campus, Selden

Time: 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

Develop applied research skills related to teaching and learning and strengthen the use of assessment information as a basis for publishable research. For complete details, costs, and to register, visit: http://www.cvent.com/d/hcqk89

 

Facilitator for these workshops will be Dr. Daniel K. Apple, founder and President of Pacific Crest. Questions?  Contact Lisa Raposo at the SUNY Center for Professional Development, phone 315-214-2426 or email lisa.raposo@suny.edu

The Research Foundation established an RF/SUNY Scholarship Program which awards CPD points to SUNY faculty, post-docs, grad students and sponsored program administrators to participate in CPD-sponsored opportunities. Contact Patricia Aceves, in the Department of Teaching, Learning, & Technology (patricia.aceves@stonybrook.edu) ext. 2-2786 for further information on accessing CPD points to attend these programs.

Stony Brook University Geoscientists Use Numerical Model to Better Forecast Forces Behind Earthquakes

William E. Holt, Ph.D. and Attreyee Ghosh, Ph.D. studied the movement of Earth’s tectonic plates and the forces behind them

Stony Brook University researchers have devised a numerical model to help explain the linkage between earthquakes and the powerful forces that cause them, according to a research paper scheduled to be published in the journal Science on Feb. 17. Their findings hold implications for long-term forecasting of earthquakes.

William E. Holt, Ph.D., a professor in the Geosciences Department at Stony Brook University, and Attreyee Ghosh, Ph.D., a post doctoral associate, used their model to help explain the stresses that act on the Earth’s tectonic plates. Those stresses result in earthquakes not only at the boundaries between tectonic plates, where most earthquakes occur, but also in the plate interiors, where the forces are less understood, according to their paper, “Plate Motions and Stresses from Global Dynamic Models.”

“If you take into account the effects of topography and all density variations within the plates – the earth’s crust varies in thickness depending on where you are – if you take all that into account, together with the mantle convection system, you can do a good job explaining what is going on at the surface,” said Dr. Holt.

Their research focused on the system of plates that float on the Earth’s fluid-like mantle, which acts as a convection system on geologic time scales, carrying them and the continents that rest upon them. These plates bump and grind past one another, diverge from one another, or collide or sink (subduct) along the plate boundary zones of the world. Collisions between the continents have produced spectacular mountain ranges and powerful earthquakes. But the constant stress to which the plates are subjected also results in earthquakes within the interior of those plates.

“Predicting plate motions correctly, along with stresses within the plates, has been a challenge for global dynamic models,” the researchers wrote. “Accurate predictions of these is vitally important for understanding the forces responsible for the movement of plates, mountain building, rifting of continents, and strain accumulation released in earthquakes.”

Data for their global computer model came from Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements, which track the movements of the Earth’s crust within the deforming plate boundary zones; measurements on the orientation of the Earth’s stress field gleaned from earthquake faults; and a network of global seismometers that provided a picture of the Earth’s interior density variations. They compared output from their model with these measurements from the Earth’s surface.

“These observations – GPS, faults – allow one to test the completeness of the model,” Dr. Holt said.

Drs. Ghosh and Holt found that plate tectonics is an integrated system, driven by density variations found between the surface of the Earth all the way to the Earth’s core-mantle boundary. A surprising find was the variation in influence between relatively shallow features (topography and crustal thickness variations) and deeper large-scale mantle flow patterns that assist and, in some places, resist plate motions. Ghosh and Holt also found that it is the large-scale mantle flow patterns, set up by the long history of sinking plates, that are important for influencing the stresses within, and motions of, the plates.

Topography also has a major influence on the plate tectonic system, the researchers found. That result suggests a powerful feedback between the forces that make the topography and the ‘push-back’ on the system exerted by the topography, they explained.

While their model cannot accurately predict when and where earthquakes will occur in the short-term, “it can help at better understanding or forecasting earthquakes over longer time spans,” Dr. Holt said. “Nobody can yet predict, but ultimately given a better understanding of the forces within the system, one can develop better forecast models.”

PA-12-100: Administrative Supplements to Existing NIH Grants and Cooperative Agreements (Parent Admin Supp)

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) hereby notify Principal Investigators holding specific types of NIH research grants, listed in the full Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) that funds may be available for administrative supplements to meet increased costs that are within the scope of the approved award, but that were unforeseen when the new or renewal application or grant progress report for non-competing continuation support was submitted.  Applications for administrative supplements are considered prior approval requests (as described in Section 8.1.2.11 of the NIH Grants Policy Statement) and will be routed directly to the Grants Management Officer of the parent award.

Additional funds may be awarded as supplements to parent awards using the following Activity Code(s):

R01 Research Project Grant
R03 Small Grant Program
R21 Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Award
R33 Exploratory/Developmental Grants Phase II
P01 Research Program Projects
P20 Exploratory Grants
P30 Center Core Grants
P50 Specialized Center
P60 Comprehensive Center
U01 Research Project – Cooperative Agreements
U19 Research Program – Cooperative Agreements
U54 Specialized Center- Cooperative Agreements
UM1 Multi-Component Research Project Cooperative Agreements
R41 Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Grant – Phase I only
R41/R42 Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Grant – Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track
R41/R42 Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Grant – Phase I and Phase II
R42 Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Grant – Phase II only
R43 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grant – Phase I only R43/R44 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grant – Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track
R43/R44 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grant – Phase I and Phase II
R44 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grant – Phase II only
C06 Research Facilities Construction Grant
D43 International Research Training Grants
D71 International Research Training  Planning Grant
DP1 NIH Director’s Pioneer Award (NDPA)
DP2 NIH Director’s New Innovator Awards
DP3 Type 1 Diabetes Targeted Research Award
DP4 NIH Director’s Pathfinder Award- Multi-Yr Funding
DP5/UP5 Early Independence Award/Cooperative Agreement
F05 International Research Fellowships
F30 Individual Predoctoral NRSA for MD/PhD Fellowships
F31 Predoctoral Individual National Research Service Grant Award
F32 Postdoctoral Individual National Research Service Award
F33 National Research Service Awards for Senior Fellows
F34 MARC (NRSA) Faculty Fellowship
G08 Resources Project Grant (NLM)
G12 Research Centers in Minority Institutions Award
G13 Health Sciences Publication Support Awards (NLM)
G20 Grants for Repair, Renovation and Modernization of Existing Research Facilities (NCRR)
K01 Research Scientist Development Award – Research & Training
K02 Research Scientist Development Award – Research
K05 Research Scientist Award
K06 Research Career Awards
K07 Academic/Teacher Award (ATA)
K08 Clinical Investigator Award (CIA)
K12 Physician Scientist Award (Program) (PSA)
K14 Minority School Faculty Development Awards
K18 Career Enhancement Award
K22 Career Transition Award
K23 Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award
K24 Midcareer Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research
K25 Mentored Quantitative Research Career Development Award
K26 Midcareer Investigator Award in Biomedical and Behavioral Research
K99/R00 Career Transition Award/Research Transition Award
KL2 Mentored Career Development Award
KM1 Institutional Career Enhancement Awards
P40 Animal (Mammalian and Nonmammalian) Model, and Animal and Biological Material Resource Grants
P41 Biotechnology Resource Grants
P51 Primate Research Center Grants
PN1 Concept Development Award
PN2 Research Development Center
R13 Support for Conferences and Scientific Meetings
R13/U13 Support for Conferences and Scientific Meetings
R15 Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA)
R18 Research Demonstration and Disseminations Projects
U18 Research Demonstration – Cooperative Agreements
R21/R33 Phased Innovation Award
R24 Resource-Related Research Projects
R25 Education Projects
R30 Preventive Health Service – Venereal Disease Research, Demonstration, and Public Information and Education Grants
R34 Clinical Trial Planning Grant Program
R36 Dissertation Award
R37 Method to Extend Research in Time (MERIT) Award
R49 Injury Control Research and Demonstration Projects and Injury Prevention Research Centers
S06 Research-Related Programs
S07 Biomedical Research Support Grants
S10 Biomedical Research Support Shared Instrumentation Grants
S11 Minority Biomedical Research Support Thematic Project Grants
S21 Research and Institutional Resources Health Disparities Endowment Grants – Capacity Building
S22 Research and Student Resources Health Disparities Endowment Grants – Educational Programs
SC1 Research-Enhancement Award
SC2 Pilot Research Project
SC3 Research Continuance Award
T14 Conferences
T15 Continuing Education Training Grants
T32 Institutional National Research Service Award (NRSA)
T34 MARC Undergraduate NRSA Institutional Grants
T35 National Research Service Award (NRSA) Short -Term Research Training
T36 MARC Ancillary Training Activities Grant
T37 Minority International Research Training Grants
T90/R90 Interdisciplinary Research Training Award/Interdisciplinary Regular Research Training Award
TL1 Linked Training Award
U10 Cooperative Clinical Research – Cooperative Agreements
U24 Resource-Related Research Projects – Cooperative Agreements
U34 Clinical Planning Grant Cooperative Agreement
U41 Biotechnology Resource Cooperative Agreements
U42 Animal (Mammalian and Nonmammalian) Model, and Animal and Biological Materials Resource Cooperative Agreements
U45 Hazardous Waste Worker Health and Safety Training Cooperative Agreements
U56 Exploratory Grants – Cooperative Agreements
U84 Cooperative Agreements for Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Prevention Research Programs
U90 Cooperative Agreements for Special Projects of National Significance (SPNS)
UC7 National Biocontainment Laboratory Operation Cooperative Agreement
U2R International Research Training Cooperative Agreements
UC4 High Impact Research and Research Infrastructure – Cooperative Agreement Programs
UH2 Exploratory/Developmental Cooperative Agreement Phase I
UH2/UH3 Phase Innovation Awards Cooperative Agreement
UH3 Exploratory/Developmental Cooperative Agreement Phase II
UL1 Linked Specialized Center Cooperative Agreement

Although requests for administrative supplements may be submitted through this FOA, there is no guarantee that funds are available from the awarding IC or for any specific grant. All applicants are encouraged to discuss potential requests with the awarding IC. Additionally, prior to submission, applicants must review the awarding IC’s web site to ensure they meet the IC’s requirements.  A list of those web sites is available at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/admin_supp/index.htm. 

Application budgets are generally limited to no more than the amount of the most recent parent award, and must reflect actual needs of the proposed project.  Note that ICs may further limit application budgets for specific activity codes or programs.  See the awarding IC’s web site for any additional budget limitations.

The funding mechanism being used to support this program, administrative supplements, can be used to cover cost increases that are associated with achieving certain new research objectives, as long as the research objectives are within the original scope of the project, or the cost increases are for unanticipated expenses within the original scope of the project. Any cost increases need to result from making modifications to the project that would increase or preserve the overall impact of the project consistent with its originally approved objectives and purposes.

For further details, please see: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-12-100.html

SBU Researcher Finds Surprisingly Low Fish Biodiversity in the Earth’s Oceans

John J. Wiens studied the relative paucity of species diversity in the oceans

A Stony Brook University researcher has found that, contrary to popular belief, there are not plenty of fish in the sea.   

In an article entitled “Why are there so few fish in the sea?,” published online this week in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, John J. Wiens, PhD, an Associate Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at Stony Brook University, addresses why the oceans contain only 15-25 percent of all of Earth’s species even though they cover about 70 percent of Earth’s surface.

Dr. Wiens and student Greta Carrete Vega examined the evolutionary and ecological causes of the low species numbers of marine environments by studying the biodiversity of ray-finned fish, the most species rich group of marine vertebrates, containing 96 percent of all fish species. They performed analyses using evolutionary trees based on molecular data and fossils, and using a large database on the habitats of nearly all living fish species.   

The study found a surprising difference in diversity between freshwater and saltwater habitats.

“There are more fish species in freshwater than in saltwater habitats, despite the much greater area and volume of the oceans,” he said, noting that freshwater environments occupy only about 2 percent of the Earth’s surface. “More remarkably, our results suggest that most marine fish alive today are descended from freshwater ancestors (even though fish and animals in general first evolved in the oceans).”   

The authors hypothesized that extinctions in marine habitats, hundreds of millions of years ago, may help explain the low present-day diversity of marine fish.  

“Our results suggest that ancient extinctions in the marine environment may have wiped out the earliest ray-finned fishes living in the oceans, that the oceans were then recolonized from freshwater habitats, and that most marine fish species living today are descended from that re-colonization (leaving less time for biodiversity to build up in the oceans),” he said. “This pattern of ancient extinction and more recent re-colonization may help explain why the oceans are now so species-poor, even for fish.”

Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program

Funding Opportunities for Fiscal Year 2012

The Fiscal Year 2012 (FY12) Defense Appropriations Act provides $50 million to the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program (PRMRP). The vision of the PRMRP is to improve the health and well-being of all military service members, veterans, and beneficiaries. The PRMRP challenges the scientific and clinical communities to address one of the FY12 congressionally directed topic areas with original ideas that foster new directions in basic science and translational research; novel product development leading to improved therapeutic or diagnostic tools; or clinical trials that address an immediate clinical need. This program is administered by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command through the Office of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP). 

Congressionally Directed Topic Areas: The FY12 PRMRP will solicit research applications for the following 22 topics areas:

Arthritis

Composite Tissue Transplantation

Dystonia

Drug Abuse

Epilepsy

Food Allergies

Fragile X Syndrome

Hereditary Angioedema

Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Interstitial Cystitis

Listeria Vaccine for Infectious Disease

Lupus

Malaria

Nanomedicine for Drug Delivery Science

Neuroblastoma

Osteoporosis and Related Bone Disease

Paget’s Disease

Polycystic Kidney Disease

Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis

Scleroderma

Tinnitus

Tuberculosis

Military Relevance: Relevance to the health care needs of the military service members, veterans, and beneficiaries is a key feature of each FY12 PRMRP award mechanism.

The PRMRP is providing information in this pre-announcement to allow investigators time to plan and develop applications. FY 12 PRMRP program announcements and general application instructions for the following award mechanisms are anticipated to be posted on Grants.gov in February and March 2012. Application deadlines will be available when the Program Announcements are released. This pre-announcement should not be construed as an obligation by the government.

Clinical Trial
Assistant Professor level or above (or equivalent)
Supports the rapid implementation of clinical trials of novel interventions with the potential to have a significant impact on patient care in the topic area of interest
Clinical trial is expected to be initiated within 12 months of award date
Maximum of $2.2 million for direct costs (plus indirect costs)
Maximum period of performance is 5 years

Discovery Award
All Investigators
Supports the exploration of a highly innovative new concept or untested theory
Projects involving human subjects or specimens will not be supported unless they are exempt under Title 32, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 219, Section 101(b)(32 CFR 219.101[b])
Maximum of $125,000 for direct costs (plus indirect costs)
Maximum period of performance is 18 months

 

Investigator-Initiated Research – Pre-applications due April 10, 2012

Assistant Professor level or above (or equivalent)
Supports research that will make an original and important contribution to the field of research or patient care in the topic area of interest
Partnering Principal Investigator option available
Clinical trials will not be funded
Pre-proposal submission is required; application submission is by invitation only
Maximum of $750,000 for direct costs (plus indirect costs)
Maximum period of performance is 3 years

Technology/Therapeutic Development
Assistant Professor level or above (or equivalent)
Supports the development of new diagnostics or therapies that have the potential to make a strong impact on patient care in the topic area of interest
Product-oriented – Device, Drug
Clinical trials will not be funded
Maximum of $1.5 million for direct costs (plus indirect costs)
Maximum period of performance is 3 years

All applications must conform to the final program announcements and application instructions that will be available for electronic downloading from the Grants.gov website. The application package containing the required forms for each award mechanism will also be found on Grants.gov in late February or early March. A listing of all USAMRMC funding opportunities can be obtained on the Grants.gov website by performing a basic search using CFDA Number 12.420.

A pre-application is required and must be submitted through the CDMRP eReceipt website (http://cdmrp.org) prior to the pre-application deadline (available when the Program Announcements are released in late February or early March). Applications must be submitted through the federal government’s single-entry portal, Grants.gov. Additional submission deadlines are not available until the program announcements are released.

Requests for email notification of the program announcements release may be sent to help@cdmrp.org. For more information about the PRMRP or other CDMRP-administered programs, please visit the CDMRP website (http://cdmrp.army.mil).

Point of Contact:
CDMRP Public Affairs
301-619-9783

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program FY 2012 Solicitation

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program FY 2012 Solicitation is open. The Phase I solicitation will close on March 2, 2012. SBIR is a competitive program that encourages domestic small businesses to engage in federally funded R&D opportunities that have the potential for commercialization.

The solicitation describes 12 specific technologies for development. In the category of Manufacturing, they include: 

·        Development of a Microcompressor for Miniaturized Cryocooling

·        High-Precision, Random Profile Roughness Specimens

·        Low-cost Stabilized Diode Lasers for Displacement Measurements

·        Non-contact Microwave Measurement of Electrical Properties of Nanofiber Materials

·        Power Meter for EUV Lithography Sources

·        Query-based Geometric Interoperability for Advanced Manufacturing

·        Silicon Ion Source for Isotopically Enriched Deposition

·        X-ray Chemical Shift Mapping for Industrial Materials Analysis
In the category of Information Technology and Cybersecurity:

·        High-Power, High-Speed Photodiodes

·        Microfabricated High-Frequency Connectors for Millimeter-Wave Technology

·        Ultrafast Photodetector for Probing Coplanar Waveguide Electrical Circuits

·        Web Services-Biometric Devices (WS-BD) Conformant Handheld Fingerprint Sensor 

The solicitation may be viewed at:

https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=4f865ee6db0b106fbb1fee7258047507&tab=core&_cview=0.

More information about the NIST SBIR program is available at: http://www.nist.gov/sbir

USAID Higher Education Solutions Network

Closing Date for Receipt of Concepts for Internal (SB) Review: March 1, 2012 @ 5 p.m.

The primary goal of this program (RFA-0AA-12-000004) is to establish institutional partnerships that will create and leverage a virtual network of leading experts who will help USAID solve distinct global development challenges. This network will help USAID identify new solutions and by working together, save money and improve results over time.

Please note: An institution may submit no more than three (3) applications as the lead. Each applicant institution is restricted to two (2) individual institution center applications and a single application serving as the lead (primary) on an application composed of a group of institutions competing for a “Consortium level” award. Institutions are free to serve as collaborating partners (but not the lead) in as many applications as they feel is appropriate and can be programmatically justified.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is taking a new approach to solving major development challenges. By partnering with universities and research institutions, both in the United States and abroad, USAID will create and leverage a virtual network of experts who are focused on solving distinct global development challenges. Over time, this network will help USAID identify new solutions and by working together, will save money and improve development results.

USAID expects that the partnerships will focus on complex development challenges and approach these challenges by applying creative, evidence-based and multidisciplinary approaches. USAID believes that science, technology and engineering will play key roles in these approaches, and also seek ideas from the institutions as to other contributing disciplines, and how faculty, students, and staff will contribute.

The core development objectives that are outlined in USAID’s Policy Framework 2011-2015, which can be found electronically at

http://www.usaid.gov/policy/USAID_PolicyFramework.PDF

should serve as a guide for the broad types of challenges we seek to address as part of this initiative. Applicants are encouraged to think creatively and offer new ideas that will address development challenges in a manner that can be scaled and made sustainable by local country governments in order to reduce the need for foreign assistance over time.

Expressions of Interest (“Concept Notes” in USAID’s terminology) must be submitted as a PDF file to Mr. Peter Saal (psaal@notes.cc.sunysb.edu) no later than c.o.b. March 1, 2012.

The Concept Note must clearly state whether the application is for a Consortium Center award or a Single Institution Center award.

The Concept Note must:

1. Summarize the technical approach, including how the proposed center or consortium meets the goals, purposes, and characteristics of a center described in the RFA in sections 1.3-1.8.

2. Describe the opportunity to improve the efficacy of international development efforts, with a particular focus on USAID’s efforts as outlined in the 2011-2015 Policy Framework.

3. Describe how the Center will integrate with USAID in Washington and in its Missions.

4. Describe how the Center engages and partners with the developing world.

5. Explain how this approach is different from existing activities and programs, but generates creativity and novelty to advance development.

6. Provide a concise summary of the program description, program methodology, organizational capability, and expected results.

7. Describe how proposed partnerships will enhance the activities and/or support sustainability of the Center

8. State the approximate funding request from USAID and funding to be secured from other sources.

9. Explain how this program builds on resources at the institution, and its partners, as well as its past performance with the developing world to accomplish these goals.

Questions Due Date and Time: March 12, 2012 @ 2:00 p.m. EDT

Concept Note Closing Date: March 22, 2012 @ 2:00 p.m. EDT

Full Application Closing Date and Time: July 17, 2012 @ 2:00 p.m. EDT

URECA Researcher of the Month: Oleksandr (Alex) Gorbatsevych

This month’s featured student is Oleksandr (Alex) Gorbatsevych, a Biology major (class of 2012) who is doing research under the direction of Dr. Eckard Wimmer, Distinguished Professor of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology.  Although Alex only recently joined the Wimmer lab, he has dedicated many hours to training in molecular biology and has become immersed in the topic of codon pair bias. He participates in Synthetic Virology meetings and will be completing a thesis for Undergraduate Biology (departmental honors) on: “Competition between wild-type and codon pair Polio virus in HeLa cells.” For the last two years, Alex has also gained clinical research experience, working with Dr. Mark Gudesblatt in South Shore Neurologic where he has contributed data analysis for an upcoming group presentation & publication (pending) at the Multiple Sclerosis Consortium.  At the School of Health Technology and Management, Alex completed EMT-Basic training. His future plans are to pursue an MD (or dual MD/PhD) program. Born in Kiev, Urkaine, Alex moved to the US when he was 6 years old. He attended Valley HS in Las Vegas, NV, and graduated from Smithtown HS in Long Island. He credits his parents, both of whom have medical degrees, for inspiring him in many different ways to work hard, to pursue a medical career — and his mother in particular with making him read many classic writers (and the Dictionary!), something which has inspired a  love of writing and literature. In his spare time, Alex enjoys playing chess, guitar, and writing. Be sure to talk to Alex at the 2012 URECA campus-wide research poster symposium on April 25th!

For the full interview/feature, please go to: http://www.stonybrook.edu/ureca/researcher-month.shtml

Past Researchers of the Month: http://www.stonybrook.edu/ureca/previous.shtml

Summer Undergraduate Stem Cell Research Program

May 29 – August 3, 2012

For outstanding undergraduates who want to do Stem Cell Research with a Stony Brook faculty member.

Awards
Awardees will receive a $3000 stipend, room and board, $500 toward travel expenses plus $1000 for supplies for the laboratory in which they do their research.

Applications include a one page essay of the student’s career goals, two letters of recommendation from faculty, and all official transcripts. Applications must be postmarked by February 17. A committee consisting of faculty members in the biological sciences will select the students within one week of the deadline.

Please see http://www.stonybrook.edu/cesame/students/NYSTEM/NYSTEM.html